Post-Midreview: Three Questions + Moving On

Concept model: the efficient, laser-cut wood contrasted with the time-consuming bread.

Messy, half-coherent program model and color-coded model to decipher it.

 

presentation_page_01presentation_page_02presentation_page_03presentation_page_04presentation_page_05presentation_page_06presentation_page_07presentation_page_08presentation_page_09presentation_page_10presentation_page_11presentation_page_12presentation_page_13presentation_page_14presentation_page_15presentation_page_16presentation_page_17presentation_page_18presentation_page_19presentation_page_20presentation_page_21presentation_page_22presentation_page_23presentation_page_24presentation_page_25presentation_page_26presentation_page_27

Q1: Industrial factory?

I started with an industrial food factory that would be taken over for the hand-making of food. At this review the food factory was just barely clinging on as part of the program and I feel like at this point I can drop it completely. I can make a comment about the current state of our food industry without having it as part of my program.

 

Q2: What is the public getting besides just eating and buying food?

When everything else is stripped off, enough places like this exist in San Francisco. Teddy mentioned  an inverted food court idea where rather than being presented with a polished final product you see the process. This could tie into Carmen’s comment about making a bigger spectacle of the food-making, such as expanding the role of the food pantries.

 

Molly (fifth-year) mentioned that the appeal of some food eateries is the “personal touch” of the chef rather than eating at a chain restaurant where the recipes are dictated by some “higher power” (or the CEO of Panda Express). When she was in Copenhagen she and her friends liked going to this place with food stalls where you were exposed to how things were getting made,

 

Q3: Why do people live here?

As Robert mentioned, there’s not a good argument for why housing has to be incorporated. Maybe if people grow some of the food, it would give them reason to live there. Carmen mentioned hydroponics as a way to keep some industrial quality to the project. Also, maybe the collaboration aspect and the domesticity aspect of making food could make living there a key aspect but I need to push that.

 

Moving on:

I think it would really help me to narrow down what is getting made here. So much of the architecture has been made vague because it had to accommodate all foods. Since I want to focus on process now I think it would be okay to pick a food. My programs could get more specific to whatever food process I’m examining in the same obsessive, almost feverish way that I channeled into my section for the section show.

 

Something I looked at a couple weeks ago and is somehow coming back into relevancy (!!!) that makes me feel excited:

http://www.bldgblog.com/2011/01/spaces-of-food-5-madeira-odorless-fish-market-and-the-tempelhof-ministry-of-food/

odorless

The project (not built) is a self-sustained fish industry where fishermen that are usually underpaid for their catch can sell directly from. There’s a market, fish cooking school, and smokery. It uses ECS to ventilate the building and make it “odorless”. Besides just focusing on the fishing industry (which is very specific to the site and the existing industry), I see in it an opportunity to get people (the public) excited about something they usually might not get excited about, like fish. It’s also a call back to the traditional aspects of food-making.
Thank you Teddy, Carmen, and Robert for listening and for the critique! I’m excited to build on what was said and take this project to the next level.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s