StartUp: SD

StartUp is a career development center, a place where those who are unemployed, underprivileged, or in-between jobs can come to explore career options, therefore gaining skills to make them valuable in the workplace. The four main career areas present in the facility are (1) cooking and baking, (2) art and design, (3) engineering and manufacturing, and (4) business and entrepreneurship.

As a way to engage with the public, StartUp becomes a connection point between the arts district to the west, and Crane Cove park to the east, by offering an privately-owned public pathway to lead users through the site. This pathway acts as a series of ramps that connect the two edges of the site, but also provides opportunities to lead the public up and through to other parts of the facility.

As anther way to engage with the public, a large indoor/outdoor marketplace is offered along the eastern edge of the site. The outdoor portion can be used for farmers markets and other outdoor community events, and the indoor portion primarily offers residents and the public a place to buy products for use both inside and outside of the facility. This marketplace also gives users of the facility the chance to sell their ideas or products to the general public.

The design of the facility focuses heavily on the idea of transparency, giving the public the opportunity to explore all parts of the building, and get to experience all of the creation and creativity that there. This happens through a series of ramps that run directly through making spaces, creating a loop of circulation that takes users up and through the building.

Relating again to transparency, the building expresses its structure in a way that can be understood to the outside user. Beams, girders, and lateral systems are all left exposed from both the interior and exterior, providing an industrial-feeling spatial experience. Floor plates are pulled or pushed back to expose column connections, and floor plates fold up and over to other floors to show a structural continuity and provide enclosure. The pulling back of floor plates provides an opportunity to allocate areas for mechanical systems and egress.

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first floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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second floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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third floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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fourth floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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fifth floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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sixth floor plan, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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longitudinal section, 1/8″ = 1′-0″

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transverse section, 1/8″ = 1′-0″

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structure, circulation and form model, 1/16″ = 1′-0″

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clusterchunk model, 1/4″ = 1′-0″

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massing model, 1/32″ = 1′-0″

 

Review Feedback:

Margarida:

  • determine building code setback and make a decision regarding how to treat the party wall condition
  • add light to the mechanical room
  • in section, tone down areas for ramps and columns and be more intentional with where the cut is taken
  • adjust ceiling heights for different spaces

Margaret

  • design the structural system around needs of the spaces, a.k.a. adjust the column grid to be more functional
  • play with floor to floor heights
  • use the pulling and pushing of floor plates for more than structural exposure–can this be a place for egress, mechanical systems, etc.?
  • bays CAN be spaces differently
  • make large atrium space outdoors

Ed

  • structural system works well
  • look more into lateral systems

Casey

  • two different languages happening–how can the folding be expressed throughout the building, work with the ribbon and distribute uniform fillets
  • if spaces are supposed to be generic, make that argument or express floor heights differently
  • can circulation be moved to the front where the floor plates are moved back?
  • play with the atrium, make it less uniform and allow peeks into spaces

 

 

 

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